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Appeal For Missing Person

Appeal for missing person - John Scott

Forth Valley Police have circulated the following information

We are looking for information to trace John Scott, who has been missing from Denny for the past week.

John has only recently moved to the Falkirk area having lived previously in Glenboig.

The 37 year old was last seen leaving The Royal Infirmary in Glasgow about 12.30pm on Tuesday 20th of November.

Inquiries have led officers to believe that John left in his grey Hyundai i20 car registration SH11 FWX and his destination is as yet unknown. There have been no further sightings.

He is described as 6ft tall, medium build, short fair coloured hair, stubble. Last seen wearing denim jeans, a grey jumper, black jacket and white baseball cap with a black skip.

Those with information can contact Falkirk Police Station via 101 and quote the incident number 3878 of the 21st of November.

The following link contains an image of the missing person.

http://www.scotland.police.uk/whats-happening/missingpersons/john-scott

Message Sent By
Varrie McDevitt (NHWN, Admin Assistant, NW Scotland)


6/7/2017

The National Fraud Intelligence Bureau (NFIB) and Action Fraud have recently noticed a rise in the reporting of pets, and in particular puppies and kittens, being advertised for sale via popular online auction websites. The fraudsters will place an advert of the pet for sale, often claiming that the pet is currently held somewhere less accessible or overseas. Upon agreement of a sale, the suspect will usually request an advance payment by money transfer or bank transfer. However, the pet does not materialise and the fraudster will subsequently ask for further advanced payments for courier charges, shipping fees and additional transportation costs. Even if further payments are made, the pet will still not materialise as it is likely to not exist.
 

Tips to staying safe when purchasing pets:
 

Stay within auction guidelines.

Be cautious if the seller initially requests payment via one method, but later claims that due to ‘issues with their account’ they will need to take the payment via an alternative method such as a bank transfer.

Consider conducting research on other information provided by the seller, for example a mobile phone number or email address used by the seller could alert you to any negative information associated with the number/email address online. 

Request details of the courier company being used and consider researching it.

Agree a suitable time to meet face-to-face to agree the purchase and to collect the pet. If the seller is reluctant to meet then it could be an indication that the pet does not exist.

A genuine seller should be keen to ensure that the pet is going to a caring and loving new home. If the seller does not express any interest in you and the pet’s new home, be wary.

If you think the purchase price is too good to be true then it probably is, especially if the pet is advertised as a pure-breed.

Do not be afraid to request copies of the pet’s inoculation history, breed paperwork and certification prior to agreeing a sale. If the seller is reluctant or unable to provide this information it could be an indication that either the pet does not exist or the pet has been illegally bred e.g. it originates from a ‘puppy farm’. A ‘puppy farm’ is a commercial dog breeding enterprise where the sole aim is to maximise profit for the least investment. Commercial dog breeders must be registered with their local authority and undergo regular inspections to ensure that the puppies are bred responsibly and are in turn fit and healthy. Illegally farmed puppies will often be kept in inadequate conditions and are more likely to suffer from ailments and illnesses associated with irresponsible breeding.

When thinking of buying a pet, consider buying them in person from rescue centres or from reputable breeders.

If you have been affected by this, or any other type of fraud, report it to Action Fraud by visiting  www.actionfraud.police.uk or by calling 0300 123 2040.

Please use the buttons below or click these links to Reply to, Rate or Forward this message. Do not reply or forward using your standard email functions.


Livestock Worrying - Reduction

This is a message sent via Neighbourhood Watch Scotland. This information has been sent on behalf of Neighbourhood Watch Scotland

Message sent by

Willie Clark (NHWN, Community Engagement Officer, NW Scotland)

Livestock Worrying Crime Reduction

A Police Scotland co-ordinated rural campaign has seen livestock worrying drop by nearly 40% during the spring lambing season compared to last year. The three month campaign saw 43 reported incidents. Like last year, most incidents involved only one dog and in 53% of cases this year, the offending dog was local to the area, roaming free or otherwise not under proper control.

Sheep are almost always the animals affected and in 86% of cases livestock was either injured or died as a result of the incident.

This third yearly campaign has also led to an increase in criminal prosecutions with almost three times as many people convicted of livestock worrying offences and direct measure penalties increasing threefold in 2016 compared to 2015.

NFU Scotland, Scottish Lands and Estates, Scottish Natural Heritage and the Kennel Club have all worked with Police Scotland to raise awareness of this crime, encourage farmers to report incidents and to educate dog owners.

Farmers are being encouraged to help walkers by indicating alternative routes avoiding enclosures with livestock and to report all incidents of livestock worrying to Police Scotland including occasions where there has been a near miss.

Further information is available on the Police Scotland website: www.scotland.police.uk at latest news.

Contact details: Call 101 for non-emergencies and general enquiries, 999 in an emergency and if you have information on a crime you can contact Crimestoppers anonymously on 0800 555 111.

 


Crimestoppers Campaign - Road Safety 26/06/2017 15:21:00 [183642] 

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Crimestoppers Campaign - Road Safety

This is a message sent via Neighbourhood Watch Scotland. This information has been sent on behalf of Neighbourhood Watch Scotland

(Please do not reply or forward this email directly; please use the Reply, Share buttons at the bottom of this message)

Message sent by

Willie Clark (NHWN, Community Engagement Officer, NW Scotland)

26th June 2017

Crimestoppers Scotland urges public to give information on regular drink drivers.

Crimestoppers Scotland is today launching national summer campaign to encourage the public to speak up about drink driving.

Figures from crime-fighting charity have revealed that information from members of the public regarding the offence is on the rise in the north of Scotland.

In the past year (April 2015– March 2016) the independent crime-fighting Charity logged 10,000 calls from members of the Scottish public and 656 were calls about drink driving.  As a direct result, 63 were positive actions taken by Police Scotland and 23 individuals were arrested and charged

With the weather warming up and barbecue season encouraging drinking in the daytime, the temptation to drive while over the limit may be higher.

Now Crimestoppers is urging anyone who has information about individuals regularly drink driving to get in contact.

Members of the public may see their friends, family, work colleagues or neighbours regularly getting behind the while over the limit but do not want to go to the police because their fear being identified.

But those who contact Crimestoppers will remain completely anonymous.

The Charity does not take personal details. Calls through the 0800 555 111 phone line cannot be tracked and information passed through the Anonymous Online Form at www.crimestoppers-uk.org cannot be traced. 

Angela Parker, National Manager for Crimestoppers in Scotland said: “Those who drink drive are not only endangering their own lives, they’re putting others at risk too.

“We want to ensure the roads stay safe this summer and we need members of the public to help us do this by passing on information about anyone who is regularly getting behind the wheel while over the drink drive limit.

“By giving information to us, you could help take a potentially dangerous driver off the road. Vital information you give could stop an accident from happening and may even save a life.

“We understand it can be difficult for people to give information – especially if the person committing the offence is a family member or friend but it’s important to do the right thing.

“Information passed to Crimestoppers is completely anonymous. We never ask for personal details and we cannot trace calls or information given online. You will not have to give a statement to police or go to court.

“We don’t want to know who you are, just what you know."

If you have any information on those who regularly drink drive you can contact the charity Crimestoppers anonymously on 0800 555 111 or via the online secure form at www.crimestoppers-uk.org

If you see someone attempting to operate a vehicle whilst intoxicated please call 999 as this may require urgent police action.


13/06/2017

Counter Terrorism Awareness Week 13/06/2017 

Counter Terrorism Awareness Week

This is a message sent via Neighbourhood Watch Scotland. This information has been sent on behalf of Neighbourhood Watch Scotland

Message sent by

Willie Clark (NHWN, Community Engagement Officer, NW Scotland)


Police Scotland has launched a targeted week of action to promote counter-terrorism activity across the country.

The Counter Terrorism Awareness Week forms part of the UK Counter Terrorism Policing Networks Initiative and is co-ordinated by the National CT Policing Headquarters.

From Monday 12th until Sunday 18th June, specialist and local officers will be working together along with a number of partners to undertake a range of activities throughout Scotland, aimed at providing the public with useful information to help deter terrorism and keep them safe in the event of a terrorist incident.

In response to the tragic events in Manchester and London and other recent incidents, which have occurred across the world, Counter Terrorism Awareness Week will focus on safety and security in crowded public spaces.

On Tuesday 23rd May, the national threat level was raised to Critical, meaning another attack in Britain is considered imminent.  Following review by the Joint Terrorism Analysis Centre (JTAC) this was reduced to SEVERE on Saturday 27th May, meaning that an attack is still highly likely.

However, Police Scotland’s message to the public remains the same -“Be alert, not alarmed” and “Be vigilant and report suspicious behaviour”. 

The public should continue go about their daily business as normal, however we would ask that they be vigilant to suspicious activity and report it to us.

To launch Counter Terrorism Awareness Week, Local Day of Action officers, along with a wide range of partners, were in attendance at Aberdeen’s Union Square on Monday 12th June to commence the week’s activity.
 
Attendees took part in a briefing led by ACC Steve Johnson, the Police Scotland lead on Organised Crime and Counter Terrorism, and specialist Counter Terrorism Security Advisers, about Counter Terrorism Awareness Week, reminding those present of the useful advice about Run, Hide, Tell
 
Over the course of the week various events, awareness-raising seminars and business security training will be held throughout the cities of Aberdeen, Dundee, Inverness, Stirling, Perth, Edinburgh and Glasgow. These have all been specifically planned to demonstrate the range of resources and capabilities at Police Scotland’s disposal in relation to counter-terrorism.

Assistant Chief Constable Steve Johnson said: “The purpose of this week-long initiative is not to alarm the public, but to provide them with all the necessary information they require to identify suspicious activity and more importantly, to keep themselves safe and secure.

“The tragic events in Manchester and London have undoubtedly left our communities shaken and concerned and our activities taking place throughout Counter Terrorism Awareness Week are aimed at offering reassurance to the public by demonstrating the range of capabilities at our disposal to both deter, and respond to, terrorism-related incidents.

“As was the case during our Counter Terrorism Day of Action in November 2016, there is no specific intelligence suggesting an attack in Scotland, however keeping our communities informed is essential to ensure they can assist counter terrorism.

“I have said before that ‘Communities Defeat Terrorism’ and Scotland’s greatest defence against the terrorist threat is our close knit communities and the relationship police and partners have with the public.

“I would like to thank our colleagues from all partner agencies for their continued support of counter-terrorism policing and for the assistance they are providing throughout Counter Terrorism Awareness Week.

“We are demonstrating that Scotland is a hostile environment for those intent on causing harm and by continuing to work together we can ensure this remains the case.

“The events taking place this week are primarily focussed on the country’s cities; however, all of our communities should be mindful of countering terrorism.”

Cabinet Secretary for Justice, Mr Michael Matheson said: “Understandably, given the horrific events in London on 3 June, the third attack in the UK in the last three months, many people in Scotland have concerns about the threats posed by terrorism.

“We must not allow terrorism to triumph, people should not be afraid to go about their daily business as usual.  Police Scotland rightfully reviewed security arrangements of major events following the recent incidents but security is a responsibility we all share and we need to continue to work together, and benefit from our strong community links, in keeping each other safe.
 
“Initiatives like Counter Terrorism Awareness Week are important, now more than ever.  As part of the week, Police Scotland and their partners will be providing practical advice and taking forward a wide range of engagements to inform and reassure the public. These will include more visible police presence in cities across Scotland and awareness raising events.  I would encourage us all to engage in these opportunities.”

Superintendent David Marshall said: “Recent events have highlighted the importance of people reporting anything suspicious or out of the ordinary.

“We are rightly proud of the fact that we have a largely open and accessible transport network in this country. However this means the police and public must work together to ensure it continues to remain as secure and safe as possible.

“It can be easy to become oblivious to your surroundings. During this week people are reminded of the important part they play in keeping themselves and fellow passengers safe.

“If we can utilise the eyes and the ears of the public in surveillance of the transport system, combined with our substantial CCTV coverage, we stand every chance of detecting and stopping potential attacks.

“If you see anything suspicious you can text from your phone to 61016, call us on 0800 40 50 40 or tell a member of rail staff, or one of our officers when you see them on patrol. In an emergency, always call 999.”


 

Action Fraud (Action Fraud, Administrator, National) 6/6/2017

 

With the upcoming “Wedding Season”, and for those individuals who are considering making plans for next year and beyond, you should be aware of the potential risks of fraud involved.  
 
According to ‘bridesmagazine.co.uk’, in 2017 the average wedding cost spend is approximately £30,111.  This will be paid out to multiple vendors, including; photographers, caterers, reception venues and travel companies, to name a few.  Many of these services will require booking at least several months in advance and you may be obliged to pay a deposit or even the full balance at the time.  
 
Being aware of the potential risks and following the below prevention advice could minimise the likelihood of fraud:


Paying by Credit Card will provide you with protection under Section 75 of the Consumer Credit Act, for purchases above £100 and below £30,000. This means that even if a Company goes into liquidation before your big day, you could claim a refund through your Credit Card Company.

 

Social Media - Some Companies run their businesses entirely via social media sites, offering low cost services.  Whilst many are genuine, some may not be insured or may even be fraudulent. There are a few things you can do to protect yourself;

 Ensure you obtain a physical address and contact details for the vendor and verify this information.  Should you experience any problems, you will then be able to make a complaint to Trading Standards or consider pursuing via the Small Claims Court.

Ensure you obtain a contract before paying money for services.  Make certain you fully read and understand what you are signing and note the terms of cancellation. 

 

Consider purchasing Wedding Insurance - Policies vary in cover and can be purchased up to two years in advance.  They can protect you from events that would not be covered under the Consumer Credit Act.

 

Complete research on each vendor, ensuring you are dealing with a bona fide person or company.  Explore the internet for reviews and ratings and ask the vendor to provide details of past clients you can speak to. You should do this even if using companies recommended by a trustworthy friend or source.   

 

For services such as wedding photographers, beware of websites using fake images. Look for inconsistencies in style; Meet the photographer in person and ask to view sample albums. If you like an image from a wedding, ask to view the photographs taken of the whole event so you can see the overall quality.    

 

Remember, if something appears too good to be true, it probably is!

 

Please use the buttons below or click these links to Reply to, Rate or Forward this message. Do not reply or forward using your standard email functions.

 

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Willie Clark (NHWN, Community Engagement Officer, NW Scotland) 5/6/2017

 

Recent Scam – Government Gateway

 

A recent SCAM has been reported to NWS via a member relating to a refund entitlement from HM Revenue and Customs based on an alleged recalculation of personal “fiscal activity “. The notification is sent by email and invites the recipient to claim the refund directly onto their credit /debit card by clicking on a listed gateway link.

Warning:

·        The Government Gateway is a one way process to allow taxpayers to access their accounts online. Government Gateway would not directly communicate with the individual by email.

·        Note any spelling mistakes and language used “ fiscal activity”

·        Note any indications that the email was created via a non UK keyboard – use of strange lettering and symbols on text.

·        If you are eligible for a tax refund or due to pay more tax this would be transmitted via a written letter

·        Any over or underpayment would show on your tax account which you should be able to access yourself via HMRC or the Government Gateway. You would never need to make a claim for money owed to you by HMRC.

Advice:

These type of SCAMS can come in many forms. To avoid being a victim

·        Always be suspicious of unsolicited emails from anyone claiming to be a Government body or Bank

·        Never click on links or use phone numbers provided by an email

·        Only use your own legitimate access process – Telephone numbers for your Bank, Tax Account etc. from official paperwork, websites.

·        Ensure your email security and spam settings are appropriate and keep your computer or device updated with relevant security software from your system provider / operator

·        To avoid Phone SCAMS consider investing in a call blocker phone

·        Delete suspicious or unknown emails. If legitimate, contact will be made by other means

·        Inform Action Fraud – www.actionfraud.police.uk

 

This is a message sent via Neighbourhood Watch Scotland. This information has been sent on behalf of Action Fraud (National Fraud Intelligence Bureau)

(Please do not reply or forward this email directly; please use the Reply, Share buttons at the bottom of this message)

Message sent by

Action Fraud (Action Fraud, Administrator, National)


Smishing – the term used for SMS phishing – is an activity which enables criminals to steal victims’ money or identity, or both, as a result of a response to a text message. Smishing uses your mobile phone (either a smartphone or traditional non-internet connected handset) to manipulate innocent people into taking various actions which can lead to being defrauded.
 
The National Fraud Intelligence Bureau has received information that fraudsters are targeting victims via text message, purporting to be from their credit card provider, stating a transaction has been approved on their credit card.
 
The text message further states to confirm if the transaction is genuine by replying ‘Y’ for Yes or ‘N’ for No. 
 
Through this method the fraudster would receive confirmation of the victim’s active telephone number and would be able to engage further by asking for the victim’s credit card details, CVV number (the three digits on the back of your bank card) and/or other personal information.
 
Protect yourself:

Always check the validity of the text message by contacting your credit card provider through the number provided at the back of the card or on the credit card/bank statement.

Beware of cold calls purporting to be from banks and/or credit card providers.

If the phone call from the bank seems suspicious, hang up the phone and wait for 10 minutes before calling the bank back. Again, refer to the number at the back of the card or on the bank statement in order to contact your bank.

If you have been a victim of fraud or cyber crime, please report it to Action Fraud athttp://www.actionfraud.police.uk/ or alternatively by calling 0300 123 2040


   May 16

Cyber Resilience Information 16/05/2017 16:05:01 [179650] 

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Manchester attack statement from Chief Constable Gormley

Statement from Chief Constable Phil Gormley following the Manchester terror attack on Monday evening.

Chief Constable Phil Gormley said: “My thoughts and those of everyone at Police Scotland continue to be with those who have lost loved ones or who were injured in the attack in Manchester.

“With the threat level now at Critical, we have now established a multi-agency co-ordination centre to lead and co-ordinate the response across the country along with key partners.

“Police Scotland will be increasing our operations to protect the people of Scotland, our businesses and public places.

“This may include a range of options aimed at increasing security at these sites, reassuring residents, businesses, workers and visitors so they can go about their daily lives as normally as possible.

“Yesterday morning, we increased the number of armed police on patrol at key locations and the public should expect to see armed officers on foot patrol.

“We are reviewing all significant events along with event organisers taking place within the next 14 days and will increase the security footprint around those events where it is deemed appropriate.

“We have well-rehearsed plans to respond to major incidents and we will be continuing to work with our partners to address the current heightened threat.

“However, there is no intelligence to suggest there is any specific threat to Scotland but I would ask the public to remain alert and report anything suspicious.”

Contact Details

Call 101 for non-emergencies and general enquiries, in an emergency call 999. If you have information about a crime you can also contact Crimestoppers anonymously on 0800 555 111.

 

Useful links:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/recognising-the-terrorist-threat/recognising-the-terrorist-threat#stay-safe--terrorist-firearms-and-weapons-attacks

 

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/stay-safe-film

​ ​


Cyber Resilience Information

This is a message sent via Neighbourhood Watch Scotland. This information has been sent on behalf of Neighbourhood Watch Scotland

(Please do not reply or forward this email directly; please use the Reply, Share buttons at the bottom of this message)

Message sent by

 


Action Fraud (Action Fraud, Administrator, National)


There has been a series of recent incidents reported to Action Fraud where a lone fraudster has approached victims whom they believe to be unfamiliar with the local area. They make an excuse to talk to the victims such as enquiring about directions or offering a recommendation for a good hotel. 
 
After this interaction, several other fraudsters will intervene purporting to be police officers in plain clothes and will sometimes present false identification as proof. The fake officers will then give a reason to examine the victims’ wallet, purse or personal items. They may also examine the first fraudster’s items or try to tell victims that the first fraudster is suspicious in order to gain victim trust and appear more realistic in their guise. 
 
After all the fake police ‘checks’ are finished, victims have then reported being handed back their personal items only to later realise that a quantity of money or valuables were missing. 
 
How to protect yourself:

If an individual claims to be a police officer ask for their name and rank, force, and examine any identification presented; this is always good practice but especially important if they are not wearing a uniform.

The Police will never ask for your passwords or PIN details. Do not give this information to anyone.

The Police will never request that you withdraw/transfer any money to them or to a ‘safe’ account.

If you have been affected by this, or any other fraud, report it to Action Fraud by visitingwww.actionfraud.police.uk

Please use the buttons below or click these links to Reply to, Rate or Forward this message. Do not reply or forward using your standard email functions.


Good Afternoon,

The latest Neighbourhood Watch Scotland Newsletter is out. 

This edition reflects a number of the positive changes since 2016, such as changes to our Team and Board, strengthening our key partnerships and our increasing focus on the things that communities have raised as a concern or interest when we have met with them. 
A vital step in providing you with more locally relevant information has been a shared approach to use of our Neighbourhood ALERT messaging system. Through the opportunity presented by Rural Watch Scotland and our close working relationship with Scottish Borders ALERT and Perth & Kinross Community Watch we are taking the first major steps towards achieving our objective of “getting the right information, to the right people, at the right time” across all Scottish communities.

You can read it by clicking on this link .
https://www.neighbourhoodwatchscotland.co.uk/images/site_images/28692_NWS_Newsletter___Issue___16___April_2017.pdf

Kind Regards

Brian Connel
Manager
Neighbourhood Watch Scotland
 


 

Message sent by 24/5/2017

Action Fraud (Action Fraud, Administrator, National)

Action Fraud has received the first reports of Tech-Support scammers claiming to be from Microsoft who are taking advantage of the global WannaCry ransomware attack.

One victim fell for the scam after calling a ‘help’ number advertised on a pop up window. The window which wouldn’t close said the victim had been affected by WannaCry Ransomware.

The victim granted the fraudsters remote access to their PC after being convinced there wasn’t sufficient anti-virus protection. The fraudsters then installed Windows Malicious Software Removal Tool, which is actually free and took £320 as payment.

It is important to remember that Microsoft’s error and warning messages on your PC will never include a phone number.

Additionally Microsoft will never proactively reach out to you to provide unsolicited PC or technical support. Any communication they have with you must be initiated by you.

How to protect yourself

Don't call numbers from pop-up messages.

Never allow remote access to your computer.

Always be wary of unsolicited calls. If you’re unsure of a caller’s identity, hang up.

Never divulge passwords or pin numbers.

Microsoft or someone on their behalf will never call you.

If you believe you have already been a victim

Get your computer checked for any additional programmes or software that may have been installed.

Contact your bank to stop any further payments being taken.


Report fraud and cyber crime to Actionfraud.police.uk


Message sent by 15/5/2017

Action Fraud (Action Fraud, Administrator, National)


Following the ransomware cyber attack on Friday 12 May which affected the NHS and is believed to have affected other organisations globally, the City of London Police’s National Fraud Intelligence Bureau has issued an alert urging both individuals and businesses to follow protection advice immediately and in the coming days.
 
Ransomware is a form of malicious software (Malware) that enables cyber criminals to remotely lock down files on your computer or mobile device. Criminals will use ransomware to extort money from you (a ransom), before they restore access to your files. There are many ways that ransomware can infect your device, whether it be a link to a malicious website in an unsolicited email, or through a security vulnerability in a piece of software you use. 
 
Key Protect messages for businesses to protect themselves from ransomware:

Install system and application updates on all devices as soon as they become available.

Install anti-virus software on all devices and keep it updated.

Create regular backups of your important files to a device that isn’t left connected to your network as any malware infection could spread to that too.

 
The National Cyber Security Centre’s technical guidance includes specific software patches to use that will prevent uninfected computers on your network from becoming infected with the “WannaCry” Ransomware: https://www.ncsc.gov.uk/guidance/ransomware-latest-ncsc-guidance
 
For additional in-depth technical guidance on how to protect your organisation from ransomware, details can be found here: https://www.ncsc.gov.uk/guidance/protecting-your-organisation-ransomware
 
Key Protect advice for individuals:

Install system and application updates on all devices as soon as they become available.

Install anti-virus software on all devices and keep it updated.

Create regular backups of your important files to a device (such as an external hard drive or memory stick) that isn’t left connected to your computer as any malware infection could spread to that too.

Only install apps from official app stores, such as Google’s Play Store, or Apple’s App Store as they offer better levels of protection than some 3rd party  stores. Jailbreaking, rooting, or disabling any of the default security features of your device will make it more susceptible to malware infections.

 
Phishing/smishing 
Fraudsters may exploit this high profile incident and use it as part of phishing/smishing campaigns. We urge people to be cautious if they receive any unsolicited communications from the NHS. The protect advice for that is the following:

An email address can be spoofed. Don’t open attachments or click on the links within any unsolicited emails you receive, and never respond to emails that ask for your personal or financial details. 

The sender’s name and number in a text message can be spoofed, so even if the message appears to be from an organisation you know of, you should still exercise caution, particularly if the texts are asking you to click on a link or call a number.

Don’t disclose your personal or financial details during a cold call, and remember that the police and banks will never ring you and ask you to verify your PIN, withdraw your cash, or transfer your money to another “safe” account.
 
If you have been a victim of fraud or cyber crime, please report it to Action Fraud athttp://www.actionfraud.police.uk/

 

You are receiving information from Action Fraud (National Fraud Intelligence Bureau) because you share your information with them.


Fraudsters are sending out a high volume of phishing emails to personal and business email addresses, pretending to come from various email addresses, which have been compromised.
 
The subject line contains the recipient’s name, and the main body of text is as below:
 
“Hi, [name]!
 
I am disturbing you for a very serious reason. Although we are not familiar, but I have significant amount of individual info concerning you. The thing is that, most likely mistakenly, the data of your account has been emailed to me. 
 
For instance, your address is:
 
[real home address]
 
I am a law-abiding citizen, so I decided to personal data may have been hacked. I attached the file – [surname].dot that I received, that you could explore what info has become obtainable for scammers. File password is – 2811
 
Best Wishes,”
 
The emails include an attachment – a ‘.dot’ file usually titled with the recipient’s name.
 

 

This attachment is thought to contain the Banking Trojan Ursniff/Gozi, hidden within an image in the document. The Ursniff Banking Trojan attempts to obtain sensitive data from victims, such as banking credentials and passwords. The data is subsequently used by criminals for monetary gain.

Protect Yourself:
 

Having up-to-date virus protection is essential; however it will not always prevent your device(s) from becoming infected.
 
Please consider the following actions:
 

Don’t click on links or open any attachments you receive in unsolicited emails or SMS messages: Remember that fraudsters can ‘spoof’ an email address to make it look like one used by someone you trust. If you are unsure, check the email header to identify the true source of communication (you can find out how by searching the internet for relevant advice for your email provider).

Do not enable macros in downloads; enabling macros will allow Trojan/malware to be installed onto your device.

Always install software updates as soon as they become available. Whether you are updating the operating system or an application, the update will often include fixes for critical security vulnerabilities.

Create regular backups of your important files to an external hard drive, memory stick or online storage provider. It is important that the device you back up to is not connected to your computer as any malware infection could spread to that as well.

If you think your bank details have been compromised, you should contact your bankimmediately.

 

This is a System Administrator message to hopefully put your mind at rest if you have received a recent spam / phishing email that purported to be from the Neighbourhood Alert system this week. (If you have not received the email in question then this email can safely be disregarded and deleted.).  Neighbourhood Alert is the system that powers https://www.neighbourhoodwatchscotland.co.uk.

Incident details:

Around the 7th February a NON Alert email was sent from email domain @lepmieseorthy.blowquest.com to an unknown number of recipients. The email looked like the inserted image and contained links to a phishing website.
 

This email was NOT sent on Alert but the sender included in the email name “on behalf of Neighborhood Alert” (Note: they did not spell Neighbourhood in correct English).

The email was not otherwise disguised as an Alert email and in no way touched our systems.
 
You probably did not receive this email as many email anti-virus systems blocked it anyway.
 
 
 
How did they get your email?
If you did receive this spam email then please be assured it was most probably sent to millions of email addresses, most of which can be “trawled” from social media sites and website listings.  Your email address certainly did NOT come from the Alert system.
 
If you are not convinced of this, please be aware that registration on most social media sites does mean that your data can be used, sold and shared.  If your data has ever existed on any website, this information is often “cached” and available in searched for years.

Various services available online demonstrate that your imprint on the internet and across social media is available at a price, for example: http://www.spokeo.com/email-search (Please view this site but we are not recommending that you pay for any results).
 
We are not trying to alarm you, it is simply important that you are aware of the risks when sharing your information and when you receive email from unknown sources or, as in this case, when they claim to be from a source you do trust.  Please be assured that your Neighbourhood Alert presence is fully encrypted and we can never sell or publicise your data including usage patterns, responses or email addresses.

Various follow up messages have been sent on Alert to warn people in some areas about the original scam but these have inadvertently caused some confusion.

Just to clarify:

NO fraudulent, scam, phishing or any other sort of illegal email has EVER been sent out on the Neighbourhood Alert system.

No one has ever managed to hack into Alert or exploit any of the user data.

We do not and cannot sell or share your data and unlike systems like Facebook, Twitter, nextdoor, streetlife of any other commercial operations we are regulated by explicit police data sharing and processing contracts.


I am sorry for any concern or frustration caused by the follow up messages, please be assured that we take security, reputation, and safety very seriously. We have a fully contracted Senior CESG accredited consultant who overseas our procedures, systems and hardware, we are accredited to the Home Office recommended Cyber Essentials Plus standard and operate to all relevant good practice guides.
 
To summarise: no one has accessed Alert or any of the user data, the original email in question has been reported to Action Fraud and is nothing to do with Neighbourhood Alert.
If you received a warning on Alert about the scam email then this is perfectly safe, contains no dangerous links and you have nothing to worry about.
 
It would be helpful, if you did receive the original email (which looks like the image above), if you could report it (or any other spam or phising emails) to Action Fraud on https://reportlite.actionfraud.police.uk/ or by calling 0300 123 2040

Further advice
You will find links to advice about how to identify when an email is authentic and what to look out for on this page in our Help Centre: 
 
Finally, Thank you for your ongoing participation, please remember that rating and forwarding these messages (using the buttons below) is vital for the continued success and improvement of the system.
 
Very best regards
Mike Douglas
Director: Neighbourhood Alert

 

Message sent by

Action Fraud (Action Fraud, Administrator, National) 24/01/2017


Payment diversion alert  
Fraudsters are emailing members of the public who are expecting to make a payment for property repairs. The fraudsters will purport to be a tradesman who has recently completed work at the property and use a similar email address to that of the genuine tradesman. They will ask for funds to be transferred via bank transfer. Once payment is made the victims of the scam soon realise they have been deceived when the genuine tradesman requests payment for their services.

Protect yourself

Always check the email address is exactly the same as previous correspondence with the genuine contact.

For any request of payment via email verify the validity of the request with a phone call to the person who carried out the work.

Check the email for spelling and grammar as these signs can indicate that the email is not genuine.

Payments via bank transfer offer no financial protection; consider using alternative methods such as a credit card or PayPal which offer protection and an avenue for recompense.

If you believe that you have been a victim of fraud you can report it online http://www.actionfraud.police.uk/report_fraud or by telephone 0300 123 2040.


Message sent by   8/01/2017

Action Fraud (Action Fraud, Administrator, National)


Action Fraud has received several reports from victims who have been sent convincing looking emails claiming to be from Amazon. The spoofed emails from “service@amazon.co.uk” claim recipients have made an order online and mimic an automatic customer email notification.  
The scam email claims recipients have ordered an expensive vintage chandelier. Other reported examples include: Bose stereos, iPhone’s and luxury watches. 
 
The emails cleverly state that if recipients haven’t authorised the transaction they can click on the help centre link to receive a full refund. The link leads to an authentic-looking website, which asks victims to confirm their name, address, and bank card information.
 
Amazon says that suspicious e-mails will often contain:

Links to websites that look like Amazon.co.uk, but aren't Amazon.co.uk.

Attachments or prompts to install software on your computer.

Typos or grammatical errors.

Forged (or spoofed) e-mail addresses to make it look like the e-mail is coming from Amazon.co.uk.

 
Amazon will never ask for personal information to be supplied by e-mail.
You can read more about identifying suspicious emails claiming to be from Amazon by visiting https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/help/customer/display.html?nodeId=201489210
 
To report a fraud or cyber crime, call us on 0300 123 2040.
 


19/12/2016

Lloyds customers should be on the lookout for a new sophisticated fraud that involves fraudsters sending fake bank letters. 

The convincing letters being sent are a replica template from Lloyds and include their logo, address and signature from a customer service representative.  
The letter tells recipients that there have been some “unusual transactions” on their personal account and asks them to call a number highlighted in bold to confirm they are genuine. 
When victims call the number, an automated welcome message is played and the caller is asked to enter their card number, account number and sort code followed by their date of birth.Victims are then instructed to enter the first and last digit of their security number.
The fraud was spotted by the Daily Telegraph who was alerted to it by a reader who had three identical letters sent to an office address. On separate occasions the Daily Telegraph ran some tests using fake details and were passed to fraudsters who claimed to be from a Lloyds contact centre. The bank has confirmed that the phone number and letters are fake. 
The letters are essentially a sophisticated phishing attempt and serves as a warning to consumers to question written correspondence from their banks. 

If you are ever suspicious about correspondence from your bank you should call the customer serviced number on the back of their card. 
To report a fraud and cyber crime, call us on 0300 123 2040 or visit http://www.actionfraud.police.uk/report_fraud


 

 

Message sent by  

Action Fraud (Action Fraud, Administrator, National) 13/09/2016


There is a phishing email currently in circulation that claims to be from the City of London Police. The departments that it claims to represent include the ‘Fraud Intelligence Unit’ and the ‘National Fraud Intelligence Bureau’. The email is titled ‘compensation fund’ and has a letter attachment that claims to be offering financial compensation to victims of fraud. The letter uses the City of London Police logo. 
 
The letter states that in order for compensation to be arranged, the receiver of the email should reply disclosing personal information. It states that HSBC and the South African Reserve Bank have been chosen to handle the compensation claims. All of these claims are false.
 
The email and letter are fraudulent and should not be replied to. 
 
Protect Yourself

Opening attachments or clicking links contained within emails from unknown sources could result in your device being infected with malware or a virus.

The City of London Police and the National Fraud Intelligence Bureau will never email you asking for you to disclose personal information.

If you believe you have become a victim of this fraudulent email get your device checked by a professional and make a report to Action Fraud, the UK’s national fraud and cyber crime reporting centre:  http://www.actionfraud.police.uk


Message sent by

Action Fraud (Action Fraud, Administrator, National)  23/8/2016

 

Students are being recruited, sometimes unwittingly, as “mules” by criminals to transfer illegally obtained money between different bank accounts.
 
What is a money mule?
A money mule is someone who is recruited by those needing to launder money obtained illegally. Criminals advertise fake jobs in newspapers and on the internet in a number of ways, usually offering opportunities to make money quickly, in order to lure potential money mule recruits. These include:
 
Social media posts
Copying genuine company’s websites to create impression of legitimacy
Sending mass emails offering employment
Targeting individuals that have posted their CVs on employment websites
 
Students are particularly susceptible to adverts of this nature. For someone in full-time education, the opportunity for making money quickly can understandably be an attractive one. The mule will accept money into their bank account, before following further instructions on what to do with the funds. Instructions could include transferring the money into a separate specified account or withdrawing the cash and forwarding it on via money transfer service companies like Western Union or MoneyGram. The mule is generally paid a small percentage of the funds as they pass through their account. 
 
Money Laundering is a criminal offence which can lead to prosecution and a custodial sentence. Furthermore, it can lead to the mule being unable to obtain credit in the UK and prevented from holding a bank account.

 

 
Protect Yourself
Be aware that the offence of money laundering carries a maximum prison sentence, in the UK, of 14 years.
Never give the details of your bank account to anyone that you do not trust.
No legitimate company will ever ask you to use your own bank account to transfer their money. Don’t accept any job offers that ask you to do this.
Be wary of unsolicited emails or social media posts promising ways of earning easy money. If it seems too good to be true, it probably is.
Don’t be afraid to question the legitimacy of any businesses that make you a job offer, especially if the recruitment procedure strays from the conventional. 
 

 

 


Message sent by

Action Fraud (Action Fraud, Administrator, National) 18/07/2016


Fraudsters are impersonating telephone service providers and contacting their clients offering a phone upgrade on a low monthly payment contract. The fraudsters will glean all your personal and financial details which will then be used to contact the genuine phone provider and order a new mobile phone handset. The fraudsters will either intercept the delivery before it reaches the victim’s address or order the handset to a different address.

Protect yourself

Never provide your personal information to a third party from an unsolicited communication.

Obtain the genuine number of the organisation being represented and verify the legitimacy of the communication.

If the offer is too good to be true it probably is.

If you have provided personal information and you are concerned that your identity may be compromised consider Cifas Protection Registration.

If you have been a victim of fraud report it to Action Fraud on 0300 123 2040 orhttp://www.actionfraud.police.uk/


Message sent by

Action Fraud (Action Fraud, Administrator, National)


The Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro begin on 6th August 2016 and as of late June, you will be able to purchase tickets from the Rio 2016 ticket offices.  Purchasing from an unauthorised seller or a ticket tout could leave you out of pocket; not only are the tickets advertised at inflated prices, but there is also a risk that the tickets purchased are counterfeit or do not exist. Any individual with a counterfeit ticket will be refused entry. 
 
To help protect yourself, the list of authorised sellers has been published on the official website and provides a list of trusted resellers; this can be found at www.rio2016.com. Equally, tickets purchased that are no longer needed can be sold through the Rio 2016 website for a 100% reimbursement of the amount paid if the tickets are resold. 
 
Protect yourself

When purchasing from another company or individual, ask questions; specifically when you will receive the ticket and what type of ticket you are purchasing.

Pay for tickets by using a credit card or trusted payment service. Payments made by bank transfer may not be recoverable.

Always check that the payment screen is secure by looking for the padlock symbol or making sure the website/url begins with “https”.

If you have been affected by this, or any other scam, report it to Action Fraud by calling 0300 123 2040, or visiting www.actionfraud.police.uk


Message sent by

Action Fraud (Action Fraud, Administrator, National)


The National Fraud Intelligence Bureau (NFIB) has noticed an increase in reports of fraudsters placing fake letter boxes on residential properties in an attempt to harvest the mail. Residents are sometimes unaware of the fake letterbox as the fraudsters will periodically remove the item, which may leave notable markings. The mail is then used to open various lines of credit with financial providers in the name of the innocent resident. 
 
Protect Yourself

Be vigilant and check for any suspicious activity, tampering of your post/letterbox or for suspicious glue markings on the wall.

Check all post received from financial institutions, even if it appears unsolicited.

Consider reporting theft of mail to your local police force and any cases of identity fraud to Action Fraud.

If you have been a victim of identity fraud consider Cifas Protection Registration (https://www.cifas.org.uk/protective_registration_form)

If you, or anyone you know, has been affected by this fraud or any other scam, report it to Action Fraud by calling 0300 123 2040 or visiting www.actionfraud.police.uk.


Message sent by

Action Fraud (Action Fraud, Administrator, National)


The National Fraud Intelligence Bureau (NFIB) has noticed an increase in reports of fraudsters placing fake letter boxes on residential properties in an attempt to harvest the mail. Residents are sometimes unaware of the fake letterbox as the fraudsters will periodically remove the item, which may leave notable markings. The mail is then used to open various lines of credit with financial providers in the name of the innocent resident. 
 
Protect Yourself

Be vigilant and check for any suspicious activity, tampering of your post/letterbox or for suspicious glue markings on the wall.

Check all post received from financial institutions, even if it appears unsolicited.

Consider reporting theft of mail to your local police force and any cases of identity fraud to Action Fraud.

If you have been a victim of identity fraud consider Cifas Protection Registration (https://www.cifas.org.uk/protective_registration_form)

If you, or anyone you know, has been affected by this fraud or any other scam, report it to Action Fraud by calling 0300 123 2040 or visiting www.actionfraud.police.uk.


Message sent by

Businesses are being contacted for the sale of goods or services by fraudsters, who request to pay by cheque. The fraudster sends a cheque with a higher value than the amount expected, and then sends the business a request for the difference with instructions on how it should be paid back. This is usually by bank transfer or through a money transfer service, such as Western Union or PaySafe. Once the ‘refund’ has been provided, it is realised that the cheque provided was fraudulent and no funds are credited to the business’s account.
 
The NFIB has seen an increase of 84% in the number of counterfeit cheque frauds reported to Action Fraud since November 2015. Criminals are targeting a wide range of services including paintings or other artwork, photography and lessons, with various amounts requested to be refunded.  The average amount requested to be refunded is £1,818. The highest amount requested was over £80,000.
 
The suspects have used pressure tactics to persuade victims to refund the amounts immediately prior to the cheques clearing.
 
 
Crime Prevention Advice

Be cautious of payments where the amount provided is higher than expected. Refuse to provide the service unless the correct balance is received or wait until the cheque has cleared before refunding the difference.

Always contact banks on a trusted number found on their website or correspondence that is known to be authentic to confirm whether the cheque has cleared.

Do not feel pressured to provide a refund before the cheque has cleared.

 
If you have been affected by this, or any other scam, report it to Action Fraud by calling 0300 123 2040, or visiting www.actionfraud.police.uk
 

Please use the buttons below or click these links to Reply to, Rate or Forward this message. Do not reply or forward using your standard email functions.

 

You are receiving information from Action Fraud (National Fraud Intelligence Bureau) because you share your information with them. To change who can see your information, choose a simpler email format or to unsubscribe completely click here.

This e-mail communication makes use of a "Clear Image" (gif) to track results of the e-mail campaign. If you wish to turn off this tracking for future e-mails, you can do so by not downloading the images in the e-mail itself.


Action Fraud (Action Fraud, Administrator, National)

 

A new phishing campaign which has hit students of UK universities claims that the student has been awarded an educational grant by the Department for Education. The email purports to have come from the finance department of the student’s university and tricks the recipient into clicking on a link contained in the message to provide personal and banking details. 
 
One victim reported that after submitting their sensitive information (including name, address, date of birth, contact details, telephone provider, bank account details, student ID, National Insurance Number, driving licence number and mother’s maiden name), they were taken to a spoofed website which appeared like a genuine website of their bank, where they were asked to type in their online banking login credentials.

Protect Yourself: 
 

Do not click on any links or open attachments contained within unsolicited emails.

Do not reply to scam emails or contact the senders in any way.

If an email appears to have come from a person or organisation you know of but the message is unexpected or unusual, contact them directly via another method to confirm that they sent you the email.

If you receive an email which asks you to login to an online account via a link provided in the email, instead of clicking on the link, open your browser and go directly to the company’s website yourself.

If you have clicked on a link in the email, do not supply any information on the website that may open.


If you think you may have compromised the safety of your bank details and/or have lost money due to fraudulent misuse of your cards, you should immediately contact your bank, and report it to Action Fraud by calling 0300 123 2040, or visiting www.actionfraud.police.uk. 
 

Please use the buttons below or click these links to Reply to, Rate or Forward this message. Do not reply or forward using your standard email functions.

 

You are receiving information from Action Fraud (National Fraud Intelligence Bureau) because you share your information with them. To change who can see your information, choose a simpler email format or to unsubscribe completely click here.

This e-mail communication makes use of a "Clear Image" (gif) to track results of the e-mail campaign. If you wish to turn off this tracking for future e-mails, you can do so by not downloading the images in the e-mail itself.


This is a message sent via Neighbourhood Watch Scotland. This information has been sent on behalf of Neighbourhood Watch Scotland

Message sent by

Peter Kirwan (Neighbourhood Watch Scotland, Communications Officer, Scotland)

Thanks for having signed up to Neighbourhood Alert.

Every year we look for ways to make Neighbourhood Alert and Neighbourhood Watch better but to do this well we need to hear from you.

What do you like? What don’t you like? What could be better?

Please take 10 minutes to complete our survey and help us make Scotland a safer place.

You can take the survey here https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/nws2016until the end of April

Thank you for your time

Peter K
Communications Officer
Neighbourhood Watch Scotland 


Payment Diversion Alert

This is a message sent via Neighbourhood Watch Scotland. This information has been sent on behalf of Action Fraud (National Fraud Intelligence Bureau)

Message sent by

Action Fraud (Action Fraud, Administrator, National)
Fraudsters are targeting members of the public who are expecting to make a payment for property repairs. The fraudsters, via email, will purport to be a tradesman who has recently completed work at the property and use a similar email address to that of the genuine tradesman. They will ask for funds to be transferred via bank transfer and once payment is made the victims of the fraud soon realise they have been deceived when the genuine tradesman requests payment for their services.

Protect Yourself:

Always check the email address is exactly the same as previous correspondence with the genuine contact.

For any request of payment via email verify the validity of the request with a phone call to the person who carried out the work.

Check the email for spelling and grammar as these signs can indicate that the email is not genuine.

Payments via bank transfer offer no financial protection; consider using alternative methods such as a credit card or PayPal which offer some protection and avenue for recompense.

If you believe that you have been a victim of fraud you can report it online at:  http://www.actionfraud.police.uk/report_fraud or by telephone on: 0300 123 2040.


Neighbourhood Watch

Sent on behalf of Police Scotland   15/12/2015

As part of their festive safety campaign Police Scotland are sending out the following message about home safety which they hope you will share with family and friends.

There's also a leaflet attached on all aspects of festive safety which people you know might find useful.

"Thieves know that over Christmas there will be high value presents and maybe more cash in your house than normal. Don’t leave gifts in view of the windows and keep cash in your home to a minimum.​

If you’re going away for Christmas, keep your home secure. Lock all windows and doors, set your house alarm, use timers on lights, cancel any deliveries and ask a neighbour or friend you trust to keep an eye out while you’re away.

Protect any gifts you’ve bought for your friends and family. Get them to register mobile phones, tablets, laptops and cameras at www.immobilise.com Don’t give them a good quality bike without giving them a good quality lock, and register bikes atwww.BikeRegister.com

If you’re having a house party, it can be all too easy for a thief to slip in unnoticed. Make sure you know everyone who is there. Don’t let anyone follow you into a house or through a secured communal entry door."
 


Sent on behalf of the Scottish Resilience Centre   8/12/2015

Christmas Shopping Online:

It is important to make sure that your personal and financial information is safe when you are making purchases online.  Ensuring your details are safe is relatively simple; there are 3 things you need to look out for – 
 

Http://
 

On any website where you are making a purchase or entering any personal information such as address or bank details always make sure that the information in the address bar at the top of the webpage begins with https://
The ‘s’ is essential as this indicates that there is a secure connection between your computer and the place where you are sending your personal details.  Not all websites will have the ‘s’ as part of their url. It’s not necessary on websites where you are not providing any personal information but make sure any website that you do provide with your information has it.
 
Padlock Icon
The https:// is the most important indicator of a secure connection but some websites also provide a padlock icon in the address bar.
 
Green Address Bar
Some secure websites will also turn a portion of the address bar green to indicate that they are secure.
 
By taking the above into account you can safely do your Christmas shopping online.
 
Phishing Scams
You need to be careful about giving out your personal financial information over the Internet. Be suspicious of any e-mail with urgent requests for personal financial information because it’s probably a scam.

Phishing is an attempt to criminally and fraudulently acquire sensitive information such as usernames, passwords and credit card details by masquerading as a trustworthy entity using e-mail e.g. receiving ane-mail purporting to be from your bank to update your details online by following a given link.
 
Avoiding this type of scam is reasonably easy if you can remember that:

Scam e-mails are aimed to encourage the recipient to respond.

Scam e-mails typically ask for personal information such as usernames, passwords, creditcard numbers, social security numbers, etc.

Scam e-mails are typically not personalised and some contain either bad spelling or badgrammar. Valid messages from your bank or e-commerce company will be professionaland correctly addressed with your name.

Never click on any link to a bank, eBay, or other merchants. When in doubt, call theinstitution using the number listed in the phone book, not the one provided in the e-mail orlink.

Avoid filling out forms in e-mail messages that ask for personal financial information andnever save them to your computer.

Don't click on attachments. Run both anti-virus and anti-spyware applications. Firewall andprivacy protection software are also a good idea. Update this software, as well as youroperating system, on a regular basis.

Use a cross-cut shredder or burn documents containing personal information. Do notstore PINs on your computer or other mobile devices.

Ensure that you're using a secure website when submitting credit card or other sensitiveinformation via your Web browser.

Check the beginning of the Web address in your browsers address bar - it should be"https://" rather than just "http://” and a padlock should appear in the lower right handcorner of the information bar.

Regularly check your bank, credit and debit card statements to ensure that all transactionsare legitimate.

Order credit reports on yourself yearly and review them carefully.

 
Mobile Phones
Mobile phones often contain sensitive information about you so it makes sense to take some practical measures to keep your mobile phone safe.
 
Remember to:

Keep your phone out of sight in your pocket or handbag when not in use

Use your phone's security lock code, if it has one

Record details of your electronic serial number (ESN) and consider separate insurance

Property mark your phone with your postcode and door number to help police identify stolen ones

Most phones have an IMEI (International Mobile Equipment Identity) number which is a unique identifier for the phone; you can obtain this number by typing *#06# (star hash 06 hash) into your mobile phone and it will display a 15 digit number

Report a lost or stolen phone to the police immediately

Inform your service provider if your phone is stolen or lost

Register the serial numbers of your phone on www.immobilise.com

 
Try not to:

Attract attention to your phone when you are carrying or using it in the street.

Leave your phone in an unattended car - if you must, lock it out of sight. It only takes seconds for a thief to smash a window and steal your phone.

​​


Wind Plaits in Horses                3/12/2015

This is a message sent via Neighbourhood Watch Scotland. This information has been sent on behalf of Neighbourhood Watch Scotland


Sent on behalf of Police Scotland

Police Scotland occasionally receives calls from concerned horse owners to report that their horses or ponies have unexplained plaits in their manes or tails. In such occasions the horse is otherwise untouched and has come to no harm. The owners are however rightly still concerned.  

We have consulted with Horsewatch Scotland who say that they too regularly receive calls and reports of horses and ponies with such plaits and that information was circulating that suggested the horses were being “marked” in some way for theft.  

Police Scotland, supported by information from Horsewatch Scotland, has no evidence that these horses or ponies are later stolen.  Evidence would suggest that such plaits are “wind plaits” or “wind tangles” that occur naturally especially in longer manes.  

In addition, further information on “wind plaits” can be found on the Horsewatch Scotland website, by following the following linkhttp://www.horsewatchscotland.info/crime-prevention
 
If you are still concerned or want to report any suspicious activity please call 101 for non-emergencies and general enquiries or in an emergency call 999. Alternatively you can pass information to Crimestoppers anonymously on 0800 555 111 or online at http://www.crimestoppers-uk.org/. No personal details are taken, information is not traced or recorded and you will not go to court.
 
You can get further information on how to improve your security in the “Guide to Security in the Rural Environment” which can be found on the Police Scotland website and which has valuable information for all those who live and work in our countryside. http://www.scotland.police.uk/assets/pdf/keep_safe/rural-prevention-booklet

 

 

 

 

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